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status codes

Definition

status codes rate
(HTTP) Following a HTTP request to a server, the server responds with a three digit code to denote the outcome of the request. If your website runs Apache server, you can use an .HTACCESS file to set the response code and action for any given webpage. Below are some of the more common response codes. w3.org has complete list.

200 'OK' This response is the most common and is sent back with the requested items. Most common requested items can be 'HEAD', which is a request from the client for only the headers of a file, 'GET' which is a request for entire file, or "POST" which is in response of a form being posted to server.

301 'MOVED PERMANENTLY' This is a response from server that the requested file has been permanently assigned a new URI. (This is the code you usually want when attempting to redirect search engines to new URI.)

302 'FOUND' This is a response from server that the requested file has been temporarily assigned a new URI. (This is the code you usually DO NOT want when attempting to permanently redirect search engines to new URI.)

304 'NOT MODIFIED' Resource has not been modified since last accessed or cache.

403 'FORBIDDEN' Server refuses to send request.

404 'NOT FOUND'

500 'INTERNAL SERVER ERROR' Server encountered a problem and could not comply with request. (You might see this one when testing scripts.)

503 'SERVICE UNAVAILABLE' Usually means server is overloaded and cannot perform requested action.

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